D.A. (“Dumb Ass”) Cyrus Vance Didn’t Prosecute Harvey Weinstein

In justifying his decision to let the movie mogul walk, the New York DA conflated two sex statutes.

According to media reports, Manhattan District Attorney Cy Vance had the goods on sleazy Harvey Weinstein (NOT Harvey Fierstein) since 2015, but chose not to prosecute.

We know that a $10,000 campaign donation from a Weinstein lawyer didn’t influence Vance because

  1. Vance told us so, and
  2. Vance is immune to such blandishments, like the time he received $25,000 from a Trump lawyer before dropping an investigation into Trump’s son, Donald Trump, Jr.

Be sure to read the Daily Beast article: Is This the Real Reason Cy Vance Didn’t Prosecute Harvey Weinstein?

And then peruse the Bitemaster’s previous posts on Cy Vance.

Airbnb faces EU clampdown for not paying ‘fair share’ of tax

It’s no secret that the Bitemaster loathes Airbnb. The latest news on these corporate scum involves their tax avoidance. They’re not alone, of course: All the big guys, like Amazon and Wal-Mart do much the same thing.

Source: Airbnb faces EU clampdown for not paying ‘fair share’ of tax | Business | The Guardian

You thought you were getting screwed by Time Warner Cable . . . and you were right

New York State Attorney General Eric Schneiderman has filed a lawsuit (PDF) against Time Warner Cable, accusing the company of lying to both its customers and the FCC. The suit alleges that TWC “Systematically And Knowingly Failed To Deliver The Reliable And Fast Internet Access It Promised To Subscribers Across The State”

Source: Time Warner Cable sued in New York for rampant fraud, lying to the FCC – ExtremeTech

Virtually every right-to-work state voted for Trump

According to Wikipedia, virtually every right-to-work state voted Trump in 2016. The only exceptions were Guam (which doesn’t get to vote for President), Nevada and Virginia.

Right to Work State2016 Vote
ALTrump
ARTrump
AZTrump
FLTrump
GATrump
GU---
IATrump
IDTrump
INTrump
KSTrump
KYTrump
LATrump
MITrump
MSTrump
NCTrump
NDTrump
NETrump
NVClinton
OKTrump
SCTrump
SDTrump
TNTrump
TXTrump
UTTrump
VAClinton
WITrump
WVTrump
WYTrump

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick Stepping Down From Trump Economic Advisory Council

Uber CEO Travis Kalanick is resigning from President Donald Trump’s economic advisory council, according to the company.

In a memo to employees, Kalanick said he didn’t want his presence to be seen as endorsing the president or his agenda.

The Bitemaster is no fan of Uber, but when they decide to Do the Right Thing, I praise them!

Source: Uber CEO Travis Kalanick Stepping Down From Trump Economic Advisory Council | The Huffington Post

Why doesn’t the IRS just send us a tax bill?

Why do we have to fill out a 1040 form? The IRS knows what most people owe. Why don’t they just send us a bill or a refund?

According to Cecil Adams, there are two reasons:

  1. Conservatives don’t want to make it easier to file your taxes. As long as you despise the process, you might support their “tax reform” (i.e., less taxes for the rich).
  2. Intuit spends millions on lobbying your legislators to keep things the way they are.

Source: The Straight Dope: Why doesn’t the IRS just send us a tax bill?

Bubble, bubble, toil and trouble

According to the Wall Street Journal (1/27/2016), the student loan market is starting to heat up.

It’s good news for big financial institutions, which expect to make a mint when Trump lets the private sector take over a larger portion of the student loan biz.

Of course, we’re already on the hook for about a trillion dollars in loans — money that we’re unlikely to ever see again.

Part of the cause is that, when the government throws money at something — like college tuition — prices inevitably go up. Just like housing prices rose during the 2001-2005 housing bubble (thanks largely to Bill Clinton. Andrew Cuomo and George W. Bush’s policies of promoting home ownership by minorities).

While I’m waxing eloquent on economics, I’ll explain why the housing bubble burst: The Federal Reserve raised its interest rate from mid-2004 to mid-2006. In 2006, housing prices started to decline. That led to the subprime mortgage crisis. By December 2007, we were in the midst of a recession. Q.E.D.